Hypoxylon terricola

              

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FC5285

FC5285

FC5285

FC5285

FC5285

FC5285

FC5285

Hypoxylon terricola Miller.

Stromata superficial on coniferous needles litter, effused-pulvinate, 2-15 mm broad x 0.8-1.3 mm thick, soft leathery; surface silver grey when immature, greyish brown to blackish brown when mature, with conspicuous perithecial mounds; internal tissue soft, whitish, delimited by a black outer and basal layer 30-40 m thick; margin abrupt.

Perithecia subglobose, 0.4-0.5 mm diam.

Ostioles papillate, obtuse, black.

Asci cylindrical, short-stipitate, the spore-bearing parts 100-110 m long x 8-10 m broad, the stipes 35-55 m long, with apical apparatus amyloid, cuboid to slightly broader than high, 2.5-3 m high x 3-3.5 m broad.

Ascospores 11.5-16.5 x 5.5-7 m, dark brown, ellipsoid-inequilateral with narrowly to broadly rounded ends, with a conspicuous germ slit spore-length on the less convex side and a gelatinous sheath up to 1.3 m thick visible on the less convex side of young ascospores (in China ink).

Specimen examined: FRANCE: Hrault (34): Bdarieux, Fort des Ecrivains Combattants, 1000 m elev., 16 Oct. 1976, FC-5285, on needles litter under Cedrus atlantica.

Notes: Hypoxylon terricola is definetely not a Hypoxylon as defined by Ju and Rogers (1996), but has not been included in Nemania by Ju and Rogers (2002) like most of taxa previously classified as Hypoxylon section Papillata subsection Primo-cinerea by Petrini and Mller (1986).

Despite its apparent relationship with Nemania, it has not been included in this genus by Ju and Rogers (2002) basing on its soft fleshy stromata and its ascospores with a gelatinous sheath. Petrini and Mller (1986) cultured it and assigned its anamorph to Nodulisporium, an anomalous feature in Nemania, while Ju and Rogers (2002) assumed it is referable to Geniculosporium. In the meantime it is accomodated in a suitable genus, we choose to provisionally present H. terricola along with other Nemania taxa.

While it has been regularly collected in southern France under Cedrus atlantica (Candoussau, 1977), H. terricola is only known from U. S. A. from the type collection on burnt ground (Miller, 1961), and remains a very rarely reported fungus. Interestingly, all French collections indicate that mature specimens occur in late autumn and winter, between 800-1000 m elev. (Candoussau, 1977).