Nemania aenea

              

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JF01180

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Nemania aenea (Nitschke) Pouzar

Stromata superficial, effused, irregularly ellipsoid to elongate, frequently coalescent, 10-45 mm long x 2-8 mm broad x 0.5-0.6 mm thick, weakly carbonaceous, at times uniperitheciate at margin; surface blackish brown to dull black, with usually conspicuous globose perithecial mounds, when immature surrounded and coated with a white to beige fugacious hyphal layer bearing the anamorph; margin abrupt.

Perithecia spherical to obovoid, 0.3-0.5 mm diam x 0.4-0.5 mm high.

Ostioles papillate, conical, black, darker than the stromatal surface.

Asci cylindrical, usually long-stipitate, the spore-bearing parts averaging 90 m long x 7.5 m broad, the stipes averaging 60 m long, with apical apparatus amyloid, cylindrical to urn-shaped, 3-4 m high x 2.5-2.8 m broad.

Ascospores 14-17.5 x 6-7 m, light to medium brown, ellipsoid-inequilateral with broadly rounded ends, with a conspicuous short germ slit 7-8 m long on the less convex side.

Specimens examined: FRANCE: Arige (09): Vernajoul, Pont Fag, ruisseau de Vernajoul, 31 Aug. 2001, JF-01180, on Alnus glutinosa; same location, 01 Jul. 2002, JF-02116, on Ulmus sp. Morbihan (56): Fort de Quncan, Etang du Fourneau, 23 Oct. 2002, JF-02202, on Fagus sylvatica.

Notes: Our collections agree well with the descriptions of N. aenea given by Pouzar (1985 b) and Granmo et al.(1999).

Macroscopically, N. aenea is much like N. serpens, with which it is easily confused. It will be readily distinguished microscopically from N. serpens in having an amyloid apical apparatus and larger ascospores with a conspicuous short germ slit. Other Nemania taxa with similar ascospore size range are N. aenea var. aureolutea, N. aenea var. macrospora and N. chestersii, the both former have ascospores with an obscure germ slit, the latter has longitudinally striate ascospores.

According to Pouzar (1985b), N. aenea was so far known from Central Europe (Germany and Czechoslovakia), while Granmo et al. (1999) reported it from Denmark and U. K. Our records in Brittany and Central Pyrnes are likely to be new for France. In Arige, N. aenea is so far known from only one location, where it is surprisingly fairly abundant, while it is absent from all other collecting sites where a systematic checking of all Nemania specimens has been carried out. Therefore, N. aenea can be considered as a rare species, locally abundant in favorable situations.

Like Pouzar (1985 b) and Granmo et al. (1999), we found it mostly on rotten wood of Alnus glutinosa, apparently driftwood lying on the banks of a stream, but we also recorded it on Fagus sylvatica, Populus tremula, Robinia pseudoacacia and Ulmus sp.