Nemania atropurpurea

              

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JF00068

JF00068

JF00068

JF00038

JF00038

JF00038

Nemania atropurpurea (Fr.: Fr.) Pouzar.

Stromata superficial, irregularly elongate and coalescent, widely effused up to 25 cm long x 6 cm broad, 0.8-1 mm thick, strongly carbonaceous; margin abrupt, with host surface blackened; surface blackish brown to dull black, with conspicuous to very conspicuous perithecial mounds forming a polyhedral pattern.

Perithecia subglobose, 0.5-0.8 mm diam.

Ostioles coarsely papillate, conical, black.

Asci cylindrical, long-stipitate, the spore-bearing parts 70-80 m long x 6-7 m broad, the stipes averaging 70 m long, with apical apparatus amyloid, cuboid, 2-2.5 m high x 2 m broad.

Ascospores 9.5-11.5 x 4-4.8 m, dark brown, ellipsoid strongly inequilateral with frequently narrowly rounded ends, uniseriate and finally 2-3-seriate in the ascus, with a fairly conspicuous short germ slit 4-5 m long on the less convex side.

Specimens examined: FRANCE: Arige (09): Rimont, Las Muros, ruisseau de Peyrau, 17 Apr. 2000, JF-00038, on a decorticated rotten trunk of Ulmus minor; same location and substrate, 30 Jun. 2000, JF-00068.

Notes: Our collections agree well with the descriptions of N. atropurpurea given by Pouzar (1985 a) and Granmo et al. (1999). Nemania atropurpurea is well characterized by the combination of widely effused carbonaceous stromata with very conspicuous perithecial mounds and coarsely papillate ostioles, and fairly dark brown ascospores with narrowly rounded ends and a short conspicuous germ slit. According to Pouzar (1985 a), the epithet atropurpurea given by Fries refers to the purplish tinge of the spore-print spreading over the stromatal surface, while Granmo et al. (1999) report the spore-print on stromata as dark green to greyish green.

Nemania atropurpurea is known from Europe [Czech Republic and Poland (Pouzar, 1985 a), Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden ( Granmo et al.,1999)], Canada and U. S. A. (Petrini and Rogers, 1986; Ju and Rogers, 2002). Our records are likely to be the first published ones from France. Nermania atropurpurea has been recorded by the above authors on various hosts including Carpinus, Fagus, Populus, Salix, Tilia and Ulmus.